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Katharine Beattie is a Member in the firm’s Boston office. Her practice focuses on dispute resolution and counseling on labor, employment, and other business matters, including discrimination, harassment, wage and hour disputes, wrongful termination, and the enforcement of noncompetition and nondisclosure agreements. She represents clients in arbitrations, in administrative agency proceedings, and in litigations.

Employers in Massachusetts are watching closely as a non-compete bill was recently passed by the Legislature and is now on Governor Baker’s desk. Currently slated to take effect on October 1, 2018, the law will significantly impact the drafting, implementation and enforcement of non-compete agreements in the Commonwealth. Governor Baker is expected to sign the bill into law, but before doing so, he may amend and send the bill back to the Legislature to be voted on again.

Continue Reading Massachusetts Non-Compete Legislation Awaiting Governor Baker’s Signature

Our colleague Alden Bianchi was a guest on a recent episode of Bloomberg Tax’s “Talking Tax” podcast, discussing the U.S. Department of Labor’s new rules for Association Health Plans, which change the standards for determining which small employers are permitted to band together to form, maintain, and participate in single, large group health plans.  Click here to listen, and stay tuned for Alden’s upcoming blog series on this topic!

In a landmark opinion on an important issue to employers, the Supreme Court held yesterday that employers can enforce class action waivers in arbitration agreements – leaving employers nationwide asking “what does this decision mean for us?”  This post aims to answer that question.

Continue Reading Arbitration Provisions with Class Action Waivers Are Enforceable…Now What? A Guide for Human Resources Professionals and In-House Counsel on the Practical Implications of this “Epic” Decision

As our readers know, we have been monitoring decisions regarding the ability of employers to take disciplinary action against employees for using marijuana at work (like this decision here). The most recent high court to weigh in on this topic is the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, which looked at whether an employer may violate that state’s anti-discrimination law when it fires an employee because of a failed drug test based on the employee’s use of medical marijuana. The Court concluded that employers must accommodate medical marijuana users in the normal course under these circumstances to avoid a violation of that law.  We discuss this important new decision – Barbuto v. Advantage Sales and Marketing, LLC – below.

Continue Reading Massachusetts: Medical Marijuana as a Reasonable Accommodation in the Workplace

Spurred by a recent change in a Massachusetts wage and hour regulation, plaintiffs’ attorneys are aggressively pursuing class action lawsuits seeking unpaid overtime premium pay on behalf of car salespeople across the Commonwealth. In Massachusetts, successful wage and hour lawsuits entitle plaintiffs to not only unpaid wages, but also automatic treble damages (i.e., three times owed wages) and a payment of their reasonable attorney’s fees. As a result, this recent trend poses significant risks to Massachusetts car dealers.

Continue Reading Class Action Suits Against Massachusetts Car Dealers on the Rise

As we discussed yesterday at Mintz Levin’s Third Annual Employment Law Summit, big changes are likely in the offing as all three branches of our federal government begin to deal with labor and employment issues following President Trump’s election. President Trump’s first 100 days has already included action on a number of employment and labor law issues we’re following here at Mintz Levin.  The Administration has enacted or signaled changes – some potentially significant – in executive orders and through pronouncements of regulatory and enforcement priorities that promise to impact the field of labor and employment law.  Additionally, the expected confirmation this week of Judge Neil Gorsuch means all hands on deck at the United States Supreme Court, and congressional action so far suggests a potentially employer-friendly climate on Capitol Hill.

Below, we highlight changes in the leadership, regulation, and likely course forward for each of the branches of the federal government, and offer our predictions for 2017 and beyond under the current Administration.  Continue Reading Steady as She Goes or Charting a New Course? Employment and Labor Signals in the Trump Administration

The arrival of March Madness means our firm’s Third Annual Employment Law Summit is just around the corner. Even if you are recovering from a bracket-busting NCAA tournament, we know you will enjoy our panel discussion on The Trump Administration and the Impact on Workplace Law.  Forget a basketball – employers need a crystal ball to predict how the new employment law landscape will impact their human resources policies and practices.

Continue Reading Mintz Levin 3rd Annual Employment Law Summit – What Employers Can Expect from the Trump Administration