Photo of Michael Arnold

Michael Arnold is a Member in the firm’s New York office. Michael advises clients on complex employment litigation matters, including pretrial, trial, and appellate work; administrative proceedings; and arbitrations and mediations relating to wage and hour, discrimination, noncompete, trade secret, general contract disputes, and other employee-related disputes. He regularly advises clients regarding employee performance, retention and separation issues, and compliance with discrimination, wage and hour, family and medical leave, workers’ compensation, disability, and other employment laws and regulations.

Friendly reminder to our readers that on April 6, 2017, Mintz Levin will be hosting its Third Annual Employment Law Summit at the Princeton Club in New York City.  This half-day seminar will feature as its keynote speaker Liz Vladeck, the Deputy Commissioner for the Office of Labor Policy and Standards at the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs.  Deputy Commissioner Vladeck will discuss NYC’s new Office of Labor Policy and Standards, its initiatives, and enforcement of the expanding universe of NYC employment laws (i.e. Freelance Workers act).  The seminar will also offer various segments on the most important workplace issues of the day, including how the new Trump Administration will impact workplace law, cybersecurity issues in the workplace, equal pay, wage and hour, employee relations, employee benefits, and more – it’s a program that you will not want to miss.  Registration is still open, so if you would like to attend click here.

This event is intended for HR professionals, in-house counsel, and senior executives.

Harassment has long been an Achilles’ heel of the workplace. Believe it or not, like the NCAA’s tournament TV ratings, the number of harassment-related lawsuits has held rather steady since the 1990s!  And like most NCAA tournament games, the workplace can often be fast-paced and exhilarating, but it requires participants to play by the rules and when conduct goes out of bounds, participants must be benched or even ejected.  In this regard, an employer must ensure that it has (1) the right players-personnel; and (2) systems in place not just for a successful season here and there, but for sustainable success over time that allows it to compete for the championship year after year.  So what does this look like?

Continue Reading March Grabness: Lessons from the (Basketball) Court: Avoiding Personal Fouls, Violations and Time Outs in the Workplace

This time of year usually marks the sports netherworld between the Super Bowl and the NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament, which is better known as March Madness. This lull provides employers with an excellent opportunity to contemplate the issues that March Madness creates in their workplace. We explore some of those issues below.

Continue Reading Does March Madness = Workplace Madness? Some Thoughts on the Legality of NCAA Bracket Pools, the Tournament’s Effect on the Workplace, and of course, a Rendition of One Shining Moment (UPDATED)

The New York State Workers’ Compensation Board is out with proposed regulations providing guidance to employers, insurance carriers and employees regarding their rights and responsibilities under New York’s new Paid Family Leave law, which is scheduled to go into effect January 1, 2018.  Comments on the proposed rules will be accepted for 45 days – until April 8th (although we note that’s a Saturday).  For our earlier post on the enactment of the Paid Family Leave Act, see here.

Continue Reading New York Paid Family Leave Proposed Regulations Filed

On April 6, 2017, Mintz Levin will be hosting its Third Annual Employment Law Summit at the Princeton Club in New York City.   This half-day seminar will feature as its keynote speaker Liz Vladeck, the Deputy Commissioner for the Office of Labor Policy and Standards at the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs.  Deputy Commissioner Vladeck will discuss NYC’s new Office of Labor Policy and Standards, its initiatives, and enforcement of the expanding universe of NYC employment laws (including the new Freelance Workers Act and the pending Fair Workweek legislation).  The seminar will also offer various segments on the most important workplace issues of the day, including how the new Trump Administration will impact workplace law, employee cybersecurity issues, equal pay issues during the employment life cycle, dealing with the difficult employee, the latest in employee benefits, and more – it’s a program that you will not want to miss, so register now.

This event is intended for HR professionals, in-house counsel, and senior executives.

For more information and to register, click here.

Our sister blog, Privacy & Security Matters, has just published its annual update of U.S. state data breach notification laws known as the “Mintz Matrix”.  Read the full blog post on the 2017 update or access the new “Mintz Matrix” directly.

Amended breach notification laws went into effect in 5 states during 2016 and by the end of the year, more than 20 states had introduced or were considering new regulations or amendments to existing laws. As always, we will keep you apprised of changes as our privacy and security colleagues track them.

The number one threat to a company’s information (personal or confidential) is still its own employees. Having data security and privacy procedures in place which reflect the statutes of the states in which you operate, and training your employees on those procedures, is your company’s first line of defense against negligent employee behavior.

The Fourth Circuit recently ruled that a general contractor was the joint employer of employees of its subcontractor for purposes of the Fair Labor Standards Act.  Salinas v. Commercial Interiors, Inc. has broad implications for the wage and overtime responsibilities of employers located within the Fourth Circuit, which has jurisdiction over appeals from federal courts located in Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and West Virginia.

Continue Reading Fourth Circuit Offers New Test for Joint Employment under FLSA

On February 16, 2017, the New York State Industrial Board of Appeals invalidated and revoked the NYS Department of Labor regulations we wrote about previously (and updated here) governing payment of wages by direct deposit or payroll debit card. The regulations were scheduled to take effect on March 7, 2017.

Continue Reading Update: DOL Regulation For Employers Who Use Direct Deposit and Payroll Debit Cards Invalidated

Our colleagues over at the Privacy & Security Matters blog wrote a really good piece entitled “It’s Tax Time – Don’t be Phished,” which guides employers on how to avoid phishing scams during this tax season. It’s a must read because the targets of these scams are HR and payroll departments, and employer awareness is necessary not only to protect employees, but also because responding to one of these scam emails constitutes a reportable data breach under state laws.  Employers could have significant liability for failure to provide notice to employees and/or state regulators (where required).