As of this writing, it has been over 850 days since the UConn women’s basketball team has lost a game. When the Huskies last tasted defeat (in an overtime thriller to Stanford on November 17, 2014), football players at Northwestern University were pursuing their rights to collectively bargain after a ruling by the NLRB regional director in Chicago held they were statutory employees.  While the undefeated nature of women’s basketball in Storrs, CT has been a constant, the NLRB changed the game for Northwestern football players by declining to assert jurisdiction.  However, there remains a feeling in certain quarters of college sports that some form of pay to student-athletes is inevitable.

Continue Reading March Inevitableness? Considering the Legal Consequences of Pay to Student-Athletes

My colleague Alta Ray, was quoted in a Business Insurance article entitled, Injury Records Rule May Lead to More Citations in which she provides steps for employers to avoid retaliation against employees who report workplace injuries.  The article examines the new anti-retaliation provisions to the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s electronic record-keeping rule and the challenges the provisions pose to employers.

 

My colleague Mitch Danzig was quoted in a SHRM article entitled Employees’ Use of Sharing Economy Poses Risks in which he comments on the risk employers face when requiring employees to use shared economy services such as Uber or Airbnb. The article focuses on how employers should tackle the booming sharing economy in regards to business travel, as well as the sharing industry’s future legal landscape.

Written by Michael Arnold

“Many people look forward to the new year for a new start on old habits.” While the author to this famous New Year’s quote remains unknown, that certainly doesn’t make it any less true, including for employers. We hope that, this year, you will buck this trend and actually start doing things a little differently – take a fresh look at that handbook, revisit that non-compete agreement you give to employees that, admittedly, you just cut and pasted off the internet years’ ago, perform that overtime exemption analysis you’ve been putting off forever . . . .  It’s never too late to get your affairs in order, and the New Year provides you with the perfect opportunity to do so. And for those of you with employees here in New York, and especially in New York City, we implore you do so as the laws, as you’ll see below, are once again a changin.

Below we look back at the year that was and discuss the year that will be in New York. We hope that you have a great 2014 and look forward to continuing to bring you the latest and greatest in updates here on Employment Matters.

Continue Reading New York Employers – 2013 Year in Review and Looking Ahead to 2014

Written by Jill Collins

The holiday shopping season is known for its long lines, steep sales and mall traffic jams, but it also prompts retailers and other businesses to hire a wave of temporary, seasonal employees to increase staffing levels during the busiest time of the year. The National Retail Federation estimates that retailers will hire between 720,000 and 780,000 seasonal employees this holiday season, which makes this a good time to review some key Massachusetts laws that may apply to seasonal and temporary employees.

Continue Reading ‘Tis The Season for Massachusetts’ Temporary Employees

A recent Massachusetts court decision upheld efforts by staffing companies and workers compensation insurers to close a loophole that allowed staffing-firm employees injured at a client company both to collect workers compensation benefits and to sue the company where they were hurt.  Please click here to read a blog entry I wrote for the AIM (Associated Industries of Massachusetts) Business Insider blog.