On Wednesday this week, all nine justices agreed that the Dodd-Frank Act’s anti-retaliation provision does not extend to an individual who has not reported a violation of the securities laws to the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).  In other words, making only internal complaints does not shroud an employee in whistleblower protection under the Dodd-Frank Act.

Continue Reading SCOTUS: Whistleblowers Who Complain Only Internally to Employers Are Not Protected by Dodd-Frank

Last month, consistent with their obligation under the Dodd-Frank Act, several federal agencies released for comment a joint proposed rule that would prohibit any incentive compensation that encourages inappropriate risk taking by a covered financial institution: (a) by providing an executive officer, employee, director or principal shareholder with excessive compensation; or (b) that could lead to material financial loss to the institution.  Companies that are not covered by this proposed rule should also be aware of the proposed rule because it could signal the future of incentive compensation rules for other industries.  While the full text and commentary of the proposed rule (all 700 pages of them) can be found here, this blog post is intended to highlight its contours and some of its key points. Continue Reading Federal Agencies Release Joint Proposed Rule on Financial Institution Incentive-Based Compensation

While the Dodd-Frank Act provides various protections to whistleblowers, federal courts have inconsistently interpreted who precisely qualifies as a whistleblower.  In a much-anticipated opinion, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals held, in Berman v. Neo@Ogilvy LLC, that whistleblowers who report wrongdoing internally – but not to the Securities and Exchange Commission – are protected from retaliation under the law.

Continue Reading Internal Whistleblowing Protected Against Retaliation Under Dodd-Frank, Says Second Circuit