As of this writing, it has been over 850 days since the UConn women’s basketball team has lost a game. When the Huskies last tasted defeat (in an overtime thriller to Stanford on November 17, 2014), football players at Northwestern University were pursuing their rights to collectively bargain after a ruling by the NLRB regional director in Chicago held they were statutory employees.  While the undefeated nature of women’s basketball in Storrs, CT has been a constant, the NLRB changed the game for Northwestern football players by declining to assert jurisdiction.  However, there remains a feeling in certain quarters of college sports that some form of pay to student-athletes is inevitable.

Continue Reading March Inevitableness? Considering the Legal Consequences of Pay to Student-Athletes

Written by Jessica Catlow

Do you still think that business owners aren’t responsible for wage and hour law violations? Do you think that a court will only award liquidated damages where the violation is wilful? Think again. Following an investigation into certain residential treatment facilities for the elderly, disabled and mentally ill, the DOL obtained a default judgment against the husband and wife owners of the facilities for various wage and hour violations under the Fair Labor Standards Act, including an award of liquidated damages.

Continue Reading Another Example of Owner Liability for Unpaid Wages and Liquidated Damages for Employee Misclassification