It’s been a terrific run.  A real Cinderella story.  Who would have thought that a little blog out of the northeast region could make so much noise in the thought leadership world?!  We learned a lot along the way and we hope you did too.  While we celebrate by cutting down the (inter)net (or better yet, by removing the keys from our keyboard), here’s a quick recap of where we’ve been:

Continue Reading Mintz March Madness Comes to an End

As excitement builds for the March Madness Final Four on Saturday and the championship game next Monday, another exciting event is also rapidly approaching – Mintz Levin’s Third Annual Employment Law Summit. And just as South Carolina, Gonzaga, Oregon and North Carolina have so far refused to go quietly from the NCAA tournament, one of the topics we’ll be covering is how to handle employees who resist efforts to manage their performance and conform their behavior to professional norms. This panel discussion will feature three superb guests moderated by Mintz Member Dick Block and promises to be a spirited and engaging event.

Continue Reading Mintz Levin’s Third Annual Employment Law Summit – Dealing with the Difficult Employee

March Madness isn’t the only thing we are excited about over here at Employment Matters. Right on the heels of the tournament, we will be hosting our annual Employment Law Summit. One of the issues my colleague Andrew Bernstein will address with a panel of key players is pay equity. No, not play equity – pay equity.

Continue Reading Mintz Levin 3rd Annual Employment Law Summit – Advancing the Ball on Pay Equity

This is the second installment of a series regarding legal issues affecting college athletics that will run during this year’s NCAA basketball tournament.

It is no secret that the salaries of coaches of high profile college programs are rising steadily.  In a recent report listing the highest paid public employee for each of the fifty states, 40 were college coaches.  While Alabama football coach Nick Saban led that list with annual compensation of around $7 million, the Chronicle of Higher Education also reported the Crimson Tide were just 1 of 10 athletic programs in 2014 to give more money back to its campus than it received in subsidies.  As a famous comic book hero once said – “with great power, comes great responsibility.”  It is therefore important to examine the legal concerns affecting coaching pay, which based on recent events, will increasingly include responsibility for conduct detrimental to athletic programs.

Continue Reading More Money, More Problems? – The Rise of Compensation and Expectations for College Coaches

My colleague Mitch Danzig, was quoted in a SHRM article entitled, Keep Employees on the Ball During March Madness, in which he provides strategies for employers to avoid legal claims when monitoring employees’ computer use. The article outlines ways employers can both manage “cyberslacking” and boost morale in the workplace during March Madness.

 

This is the first installment of a series regarding legal issues affecting college athletics that this blog will run during this year’s NCAA basketball tournament.

Two horrible March Madness brackets ago, we analyzed the myriad of legal and operational challenges that could change the face of intercollegiate athletics.  The smoke has begun to clear on one critical issue – student-athletes have not been granted standing to assert rights as employees.  Interestingly, the recent decisions involving the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) on this issue have come at a time of expanding rights for student-athletes.

Continue Reading A Look Beyond the Madness – Revisiting The Standing Of And Protections For Student-Athletes

Written by Tyrone P. Thomas
[Follow Tyrone on Twitter at twitter.com/tyronepthomas]

This year’s NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament may be the last of its kind. This post explores some of the brewing legal issues that may force big changes to future “Final Fours,” and in turn, the legal rights and obligations of the NCAA and its member universities, and athletics personnel and student-athletes.

Continue Reading Bracketology 101: Part I – The Bracket: A Look Ahead at Legal Issues that May Change the Face of the Final Four

Written by Michael Arnold and Robert Sheridan

With the Olympics now behind us (were they ever in front of us?), this time of year usually marks the sports netherworld between the Super Bowl and the NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament, which is better known as March Madness. This lull provides employers with an excellent opportunity to contemplate the issues that March Madness creates in their workplace. We explore some of those issues below.

Continue Reading Does March Madness = Workplace Madness? Some Thoughts on the Legality of NCAA Bracket Pools, the Tournament’s Effect on the Workplace, and of course, a Rendition of One Shining Moment